Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Feeding America Report Paints a Portrait of Hunger in America

Feeding America Report Paints a Portrait of Hunger in America

  1. Home
  2. Cook

August 18, 2014

By

Food Tank

Feeding America released the 2014 Hunger in America report, which examines the characteristics and challenges of households receiving charitable assistance.


In the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, a virus hits home: 'Hunger is rampant'

On the cracked country roads of Lexington, deep in the Mississippi delta, an empty yellow school bus drives slowly, making life-sustaining drop-offs on the way.

Here, in the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, the coronavirus has yet to ravage the jurisdiction with infection. There has been one recorded Covid-19 death in the county, Clinton Cobbins, Lexington’s first African American mayor. But even now the coronavirus still poses a serious threat to life.

In Holmes county consolidated – the school district to which Lexington belongs – every single child qualifies for free school meals, a marker of pervasive poverty. For many, said the superintendent, Dr James L Henderson, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals a student will eat in a day. For a few, they are the only meals.

When the coronavirus pandemic led to statewide school closures, Henderson, who was born in the county, left for most of his adult life, but returned in 2018 to assume his position, was left with a significant dilemma: how to feed the 3,000 children under his authority.

Robert King, transportation supervisor for Holmes county consolidated school district, delivers school lunches to student Keizarrian Thomas, in Lexington, Mississippi, on 1 April. Photograph: Rory Doyle/The Guardian

Many children in this rural district come from households too poor to afford a car. So the superintendent embarked on an improvised project, driving 6,000 meals a day out across the county in a small fleet of 70 school buses, dropping each packet off at a stop along the route.

“We absolutely see this as a matter of life and death,” he said. “We have to do it on behalf of our children. It’s just that simple. Families are suffering here.”

“If there is a silver lining to Covid-19, even in the poorest county in the poorest state, we genuinely care about each other. We are working to that end to make sure we’re providing for all children.

The novel strategy underlines the escalating crisis the coronavirus has imposed on Mississippi, America’s most food-insecure state. In Holmes county 35% of residents are already food-insecure, according to recent research and that number is certain to rise substantially as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold.

As the yellow school bus pulled into one driveway, nine-year-old Keizarrian Thomas dashed from his porch and collected three lunch packages – two for his brothers. A juice box, three celery sticks and a ham sandwich in each.


In the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, a virus hits home: 'Hunger is rampant'

On the cracked country roads of Lexington, deep in the Mississippi delta, an empty yellow school bus drives slowly, making life-sustaining drop-offs on the way.

Here, in the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, the coronavirus has yet to ravage the jurisdiction with infection. There has been one recorded Covid-19 death in the county, Clinton Cobbins, Lexington’s first African American mayor. But even now the coronavirus still poses a serious threat to life.

In Holmes county consolidated – the school district to which Lexington belongs – every single child qualifies for free school meals, a marker of pervasive poverty. For many, said the superintendent, Dr James L Henderson, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals a student will eat in a day. For a few, they are the only meals.

When the coronavirus pandemic led to statewide school closures, Henderson, who was born in the county, left for most of his adult life, but returned in 2018 to assume his position, was left with a significant dilemma: how to feed the 3,000 children under his authority.

Robert King, transportation supervisor for Holmes county consolidated school district, delivers school lunches to student Keizarrian Thomas, in Lexington, Mississippi, on 1 April. Photograph: Rory Doyle/The Guardian

Many children in this rural district come from households too poor to afford a car. So the superintendent embarked on an improvised project, driving 6,000 meals a day out across the county in a small fleet of 70 school buses, dropping each packet off at a stop along the route.

“We absolutely see this as a matter of life and death,” he said. “We have to do it on behalf of our children. It’s just that simple. Families are suffering here.”

“If there is a silver lining to Covid-19, even in the poorest county in the poorest state, we genuinely care about each other. We are working to that end to make sure we’re providing for all children.

The novel strategy underlines the escalating crisis the coronavirus has imposed on Mississippi, America’s most food-insecure state. In Holmes county 35% of residents are already food-insecure, according to recent research and that number is certain to rise substantially as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold.

As the yellow school bus pulled into one driveway, nine-year-old Keizarrian Thomas dashed from his porch and collected three lunch packages – two for his brothers. A juice box, three celery sticks and a ham sandwich in each.


In the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, a virus hits home: 'Hunger is rampant'

On the cracked country roads of Lexington, deep in the Mississippi delta, an empty yellow school bus drives slowly, making life-sustaining drop-offs on the way.

Here, in the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, the coronavirus has yet to ravage the jurisdiction with infection. There has been one recorded Covid-19 death in the county, Clinton Cobbins, Lexington’s first African American mayor. But even now the coronavirus still poses a serious threat to life.

In Holmes county consolidated – the school district to which Lexington belongs – every single child qualifies for free school meals, a marker of pervasive poverty. For many, said the superintendent, Dr James L Henderson, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals a student will eat in a day. For a few, they are the only meals.

When the coronavirus pandemic led to statewide school closures, Henderson, who was born in the county, left for most of his adult life, but returned in 2018 to assume his position, was left with a significant dilemma: how to feed the 3,000 children under his authority.

Robert King, transportation supervisor for Holmes county consolidated school district, delivers school lunches to student Keizarrian Thomas, in Lexington, Mississippi, on 1 April. Photograph: Rory Doyle/The Guardian

Many children in this rural district come from households too poor to afford a car. So the superintendent embarked on an improvised project, driving 6,000 meals a day out across the county in a small fleet of 70 school buses, dropping each packet off at a stop along the route.

“We absolutely see this as a matter of life and death,” he said. “We have to do it on behalf of our children. It’s just that simple. Families are suffering here.”

“If there is a silver lining to Covid-19, even in the poorest county in the poorest state, we genuinely care about each other. We are working to that end to make sure we’re providing for all children.

The novel strategy underlines the escalating crisis the coronavirus has imposed on Mississippi, America’s most food-insecure state. In Holmes county 35% of residents are already food-insecure, according to recent research and that number is certain to rise substantially as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold.

As the yellow school bus pulled into one driveway, nine-year-old Keizarrian Thomas dashed from his porch and collected three lunch packages – two for his brothers. A juice box, three celery sticks and a ham sandwich in each.


In the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, a virus hits home: 'Hunger is rampant'

On the cracked country roads of Lexington, deep in the Mississippi delta, an empty yellow school bus drives slowly, making life-sustaining drop-offs on the way.

Here, in the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, the coronavirus has yet to ravage the jurisdiction with infection. There has been one recorded Covid-19 death in the county, Clinton Cobbins, Lexington’s first African American mayor. But even now the coronavirus still poses a serious threat to life.

In Holmes county consolidated – the school district to which Lexington belongs – every single child qualifies for free school meals, a marker of pervasive poverty. For many, said the superintendent, Dr James L Henderson, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals a student will eat in a day. For a few, they are the only meals.

When the coronavirus pandemic led to statewide school closures, Henderson, who was born in the county, left for most of his adult life, but returned in 2018 to assume his position, was left with a significant dilemma: how to feed the 3,000 children under his authority.

Robert King, transportation supervisor for Holmes county consolidated school district, delivers school lunches to student Keizarrian Thomas, in Lexington, Mississippi, on 1 April. Photograph: Rory Doyle/The Guardian

Many children in this rural district come from households too poor to afford a car. So the superintendent embarked on an improvised project, driving 6,000 meals a day out across the county in a small fleet of 70 school buses, dropping each packet off at a stop along the route.

“We absolutely see this as a matter of life and death,” he said. “We have to do it on behalf of our children. It’s just that simple. Families are suffering here.”

“If there is a silver lining to Covid-19, even in the poorest county in the poorest state, we genuinely care about each other. We are working to that end to make sure we’re providing for all children.

The novel strategy underlines the escalating crisis the coronavirus has imposed on Mississippi, America’s most food-insecure state. In Holmes county 35% of residents are already food-insecure, according to recent research and that number is certain to rise substantially as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold.

As the yellow school bus pulled into one driveway, nine-year-old Keizarrian Thomas dashed from his porch and collected three lunch packages – two for his brothers. A juice box, three celery sticks and a ham sandwich in each.


In the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, a virus hits home: 'Hunger is rampant'

On the cracked country roads of Lexington, deep in the Mississippi delta, an empty yellow school bus drives slowly, making life-sustaining drop-offs on the way.

Here, in the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, the coronavirus has yet to ravage the jurisdiction with infection. There has been one recorded Covid-19 death in the county, Clinton Cobbins, Lexington’s first African American mayor. But even now the coronavirus still poses a serious threat to life.

In Holmes county consolidated – the school district to which Lexington belongs – every single child qualifies for free school meals, a marker of pervasive poverty. For many, said the superintendent, Dr James L Henderson, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals a student will eat in a day. For a few, they are the only meals.

When the coronavirus pandemic led to statewide school closures, Henderson, who was born in the county, left for most of his adult life, but returned in 2018 to assume his position, was left with a significant dilemma: how to feed the 3,000 children under his authority.

Robert King, transportation supervisor for Holmes county consolidated school district, delivers school lunches to student Keizarrian Thomas, in Lexington, Mississippi, on 1 April. Photograph: Rory Doyle/The Guardian

Many children in this rural district come from households too poor to afford a car. So the superintendent embarked on an improvised project, driving 6,000 meals a day out across the county in a small fleet of 70 school buses, dropping each packet off at a stop along the route.

“We absolutely see this as a matter of life and death,” he said. “We have to do it on behalf of our children. It’s just that simple. Families are suffering here.”

“If there is a silver lining to Covid-19, even in the poorest county in the poorest state, we genuinely care about each other. We are working to that end to make sure we’re providing for all children.

The novel strategy underlines the escalating crisis the coronavirus has imposed on Mississippi, America’s most food-insecure state. In Holmes county 35% of residents are already food-insecure, according to recent research and that number is certain to rise substantially as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold.

As the yellow school bus pulled into one driveway, nine-year-old Keizarrian Thomas dashed from his porch and collected three lunch packages – two for his brothers. A juice box, three celery sticks and a ham sandwich in each.


In the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, a virus hits home: 'Hunger is rampant'

On the cracked country roads of Lexington, deep in the Mississippi delta, an empty yellow school bus drives slowly, making life-sustaining drop-offs on the way.

Here, in the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, the coronavirus has yet to ravage the jurisdiction with infection. There has been one recorded Covid-19 death in the county, Clinton Cobbins, Lexington’s first African American mayor. But even now the coronavirus still poses a serious threat to life.

In Holmes county consolidated – the school district to which Lexington belongs – every single child qualifies for free school meals, a marker of pervasive poverty. For many, said the superintendent, Dr James L Henderson, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals a student will eat in a day. For a few, they are the only meals.

When the coronavirus pandemic led to statewide school closures, Henderson, who was born in the county, left for most of his adult life, but returned in 2018 to assume his position, was left with a significant dilemma: how to feed the 3,000 children under his authority.

Robert King, transportation supervisor for Holmes county consolidated school district, delivers school lunches to student Keizarrian Thomas, in Lexington, Mississippi, on 1 April. Photograph: Rory Doyle/The Guardian

Many children in this rural district come from households too poor to afford a car. So the superintendent embarked on an improvised project, driving 6,000 meals a day out across the county in a small fleet of 70 school buses, dropping each packet off at a stop along the route.

“We absolutely see this as a matter of life and death,” he said. “We have to do it on behalf of our children. It’s just that simple. Families are suffering here.”

“If there is a silver lining to Covid-19, even in the poorest county in the poorest state, we genuinely care about each other. We are working to that end to make sure we’re providing for all children.

The novel strategy underlines the escalating crisis the coronavirus has imposed on Mississippi, America’s most food-insecure state. In Holmes county 35% of residents are already food-insecure, according to recent research and that number is certain to rise substantially as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold.

As the yellow school bus pulled into one driveway, nine-year-old Keizarrian Thomas dashed from his porch and collected three lunch packages – two for his brothers. A juice box, three celery sticks and a ham sandwich in each.


In the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, a virus hits home: 'Hunger is rampant'

On the cracked country roads of Lexington, deep in the Mississippi delta, an empty yellow school bus drives slowly, making life-sustaining drop-offs on the way.

Here, in the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, the coronavirus has yet to ravage the jurisdiction with infection. There has been one recorded Covid-19 death in the county, Clinton Cobbins, Lexington’s first African American mayor. But even now the coronavirus still poses a serious threat to life.

In Holmes county consolidated – the school district to which Lexington belongs – every single child qualifies for free school meals, a marker of pervasive poverty. For many, said the superintendent, Dr James L Henderson, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals a student will eat in a day. For a few, they are the only meals.

When the coronavirus pandemic led to statewide school closures, Henderson, who was born in the county, left for most of his adult life, but returned in 2018 to assume his position, was left with a significant dilemma: how to feed the 3,000 children under his authority.

Robert King, transportation supervisor for Holmes county consolidated school district, delivers school lunches to student Keizarrian Thomas, in Lexington, Mississippi, on 1 April. Photograph: Rory Doyle/The Guardian

Many children in this rural district come from households too poor to afford a car. So the superintendent embarked on an improvised project, driving 6,000 meals a day out across the county in a small fleet of 70 school buses, dropping each packet off at a stop along the route.

“We absolutely see this as a matter of life and death,” he said. “We have to do it on behalf of our children. It’s just that simple. Families are suffering here.”

“If there is a silver lining to Covid-19, even in the poorest county in the poorest state, we genuinely care about each other. We are working to that end to make sure we’re providing for all children.

The novel strategy underlines the escalating crisis the coronavirus has imposed on Mississippi, America’s most food-insecure state. In Holmes county 35% of residents are already food-insecure, according to recent research and that number is certain to rise substantially as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold.

As the yellow school bus pulled into one driveway, nine-year-old Keizarrian Thomas dashed from his porch and collected three lunch packages – two for his brothers. A juice box, three celery sticks and a ham sandwich in each.


In the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, a virus hits home: 'Hunger is rampant'

On the cracked country roads of Lexington, deep in the Mississippi delta, an empty yellow school bus drives slowly, making life-sustaining drop-offs on the way.

Here, in the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, the coronavirus has yet to ravage the jurisdiction with infection. There has been one recorded Covid-19 death in the county, Clinton Cobbins, Lexington’s first African American mayor. But even now the coronavirus still poses a serious threat to life.

In Holmes county consolidated – the school district to which Lexington belongs – every single child qualifies for free school meals, a marker of pervasive poverty. For many, said the superintendent, Dr James L Henderson, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals a student will eat in a day. For a few, they are the only meals.

When the coronavirus pandemic led to statewide school closures, Henderson, who was born in the county, left for most of his adult life, but returned in 2018 to assume his position, was left with a significant dilemma: how to feed the 3,000 children under his authority.

Robert King, transportation supervisor for Holmes county consolidated school district, delivers school lunches to student Keizarrian Thomas, in Lexington, Mississippi, on 1 April. Photograph: Rory Doyle/The Guardian

Many children in this rural district come from households too poor to afford a car. So the superintendent embarked on an improvised project, driving 6,000 meals a day out across the county in a small fleet of 70 school buses, dropping each packet off at a stop along the route.

“We absolutely see this as a matter of life and death,” he said. “We have to do it on behalf of our children. It’s just that simple. Families are suffering here.”

“If there is a silver lining to Covid-19, even in the poorest county in the poorest state, we genuinely care about each other. We are working to that end to make sure we’re providing for all children.

The novel strategy underlines the escalating crisis the coronavirus has imposed on Mississippi, America’s most food-insecure state. In Holmes county 35% of residents are already food-insecure, according to recent research and that number is certain to rise substantially as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold.

As the yellow school bus pulled into one driveway, nine-year-old Keizarrian Thomas dashed from his porch and collected three lunch packages – two for his brothers. A juice box, three celery sticks and a ham sandwich in each.


In the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, a virus hits home: 'Hunger is rampant'

On the cracked country roads of Lexington, deep in the Mississippi delta, an empty yellow school bus drives slowly, making life-sustaining drop-offs on the way.

Here, in the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, the coronavirus has yet to ravage the jurisdiction with infection. There has been one recorded Covid-19 death in the county, Clinton Cobbins, Lexington’s first African American mayor. But even now the coronavirus still poses a serious threat to life.

In Holmes county consolidated – the school district to which Lexington belongs – every single child qualifies for free school meals, a marker of pervasive poverty. For many, said the superintendent, Dr James L Henderson, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals a student will eat in a day. For a few, they are the only meals.

When the coronavirus pandemic led to statewide school closures, Henderson, who was born in the county, left for most of his adult life, but returned in 2018 to assume his position, was left with a significant dilemma: how to feed the 3,000 children under his authority.

Robert King, transportation supervisor for Holmes county consolidated school district, delivers school lunches to student Keizarrian Thomas, in Lexington, Mississippi, on 1 April. Photograph: Rory Doyle/The Guardian

Many children in this rural district come from households too poor to afford a car. So the superintendent embarked on an improvised project, driving 6,000 meals a day out across the county in a small fleet of 70 school buses, dropping each packet off at a stop along the route.

“We absolutely see this as a matter of life and death,” he said. “We have to do it on behalf of our children. It’s just that simple. Families are suffering here.”

“If there is a silver lining to Covid-19, even in the poorest county in the poorest state, we genuinely care about each other. We are working to that end to make sure we’re providing for all children.

The novel strategy underlines the escalating crisis the coronavirus has imposed on Mississippi, America’s most food-insecure state. In Holmes county 35% of residents are already food-insecure, according to recent research and that number is certain to rise substantially as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold.

As the yellow school bus pulled into one driveway, nine-year-old Keizarrian Thomas dashed from his porch and collected three lunch packages – two for his brothers. A juice box, three celery sticks and a ham sandwich in each.


In the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, a virus hits home: 'Hunger is rampant'

On the cracked country roads of Lexington, deep in the Mississippi delta, an empty yellow school bus drives slowly, making life-sustaining drop-offs on the way.

Here, in the poorest county, in America’s poorest state, the coronavirus has yet to ravage the jurisdiction with infection. There has been one recorded Covid-19 death in the county, Clinton Cobbins, Lexington’s first African American mayor. But even now the coronavirus still poses a serious threat to life.

In Holmes county consolidated – the school district to which Lexington belongs – every single child qualifies for free school meals, a marker of pervasive poverty. For many, said the superintendent, Dr James L Henderson, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals a student will eat in a day. For a few, they are the only meals.

When the coronavirus pandemic led to statewide school closures, Henderson, who was born in the county, left for most of his adult life, but returned in 2018 to assume his position, was left with a significant dilemma: how to feed the 3,000 children under his authority.

Robert King, transportation supervisor for Holmes county consolidated school district, delivers school lunches to student Keizarrian Thomas, in Lexington, Mississippi, on 1 April. Photograph: Rory Doyle/The Guardian

Many children in this rural district come from households too poor to afford a car. So the superintendent embarked on an improvised project, driving 6,000 meals a day out across the county in a small fleet of 70 school buses, dropping each packet off at a stop along the route.

“We absolutely see this as a matter of life and death,” he said. “We have to do it on behalf of our children. It’s just that simple. Families are suffering here.”

“If there is a silver lining to Covid-19, even in the poorest county in the poorest state, we genuinely care about each other. We are working to that end to make sure we’re providing for all children.

The novel strategy underlines the escalating crisis the coronavirus has imposed on Mississippi, America’s most food-insecure state. In Holmes county 35% of residents are already food-insecure, according to recent research and that number is certain to rise substantially as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold.

As the yellow school bus pulled into one driveway, nine-year-old Keizarrian Thomas dashed from his porch and collected three lunch packages – two for his brothers. A juice box, three celery sticks and a ham sandwich in each.


Watch the video: I am child hunger in America (October 2021).