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Junk Food Cravings Attack at Night

Junk Food Cravings Attack at Night

Massive Health combed through 500,000 meals in five months, finding that most people eat terrible food at night

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Midnight Snacking Tends to Be Unhealthy

Last week new research showed that the habit of eating later in the day could have led to America's obesity problem, and here's one reason why: Data shows that when we eat later, we tend to eat junk food.

Massive Health compiled data pulled from 500,000 meals on Eatery, where users tweet the food they eat at all times of the day, finding that while most people eat healthy when the sun is out, once nighttime hits, the bad foods come out.

In the span of five months, the data below shows that Americans ate healthy (green) in the morning — the infographic depicting eating trends at 9 a.m. PST shows the healthy (green) eating.

By dinner time, most of the foods are charted as "medium"in America, as shown below at 7 p.m. PST.

By 11 p.m. PST, however, the number of people eating drops off, but most of the foods eaten are considered red, or extremely unhealthy.

NPR The Salt reports that this trend isn't just an American way of eating; people across the globe tend to eat more unhealthy food later at night.

As for how much people eat during the day, the data shows the people eat the least for breakfast, eating 3.9 percent more for lunch, and 5 percent more for dinner, a Massive Health representative told us.

Massive Health also found that we eat worse over the weekends, eating 1.5 times as many cupcakes and downing 1.6 times as much beer. The trend of eating junk food at night, however, may be half the reason why a 16-hour nighttime fast might just work.


What Happens to Your Body When You Late-Night Snack

Now that so many of us are spending most of our time at home, a lot of us are also staying up later and (most likely) eating more as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And hey, the late-night snack just comes calling sometimes. In fact, 42 percent of people say they are eating more snack foods since the virus started to spread in the United States and 23 percent admit to drinking more alcohol, according to a Harris Poll.

That doesn't come as much of a surprise to experts in stress and emotional eating. According to clinical psychologist Vaile Wright, Ph.D., senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association, it's common to reach for food in times of stress because it gives us a sense of control.

"The primary driver [of stress right now] is the uncertainty with this virus: It's invisible it happened very rapidly we still have questions about its transmissibility, and we have no cure," Wright says.

Stress and boredom can be huge overeating triggers, says Dwain Fehon, PsyD, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University and director of behavioral medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. "It's when we're not doing much, when we're idle or feeling overwhelmed, that we may eat as a way of managing stress. The boredom and restless energy that can come from being quarantined may cause some people to want to reach for snacks as a way to self-soothe," he told Yale School of Medicine News.

And when we stress eat, we often choose nighttime snacks that are high in sugar and fat for a strategic biological reason: "They both create endorphins they literally make us feel better," Wright says.

One downside of those feel-good brain chemicals from midnight snacking on pints of Ben & Jerry's is they can be addictive, causing us to overconsume. Here's how late-night quarantine eating may affect your body.


What Happens to Your Body When You Late-Night Snack

Now that so many of us are spending most of our time at home, a lot of us are also staying up later and (most likely) eating more as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And hey, the late-night snack just comes calling sometimes. In fact, 42 percent of people say they are eating more snack foods since the virus started to spread in the United States and 23 percent admit to drinking more alcohol, according to a Harris Poll.

That doesn't come as much of a surprise to experts in stress and emotional eating. According to clinical psychologist Vaile Wright, Ph.D., senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association, it's common to reach for food in times of stress because it gives us a sense of control.

"The primary driver [of stress right now] is the uncertainty with this virus: It's invisible it happened very rapidly we still have questions about its transmissibility, and we have no cure," Wright says.

Stress and boredom can be huge overeating triggers, says Dwain Fehon, PsyD, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University and director of behavioral medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. "It's when we're not doing much, when we're idle or feeling overwhelmed, that we may eat as a way of managing stress. The boredom and restless energy that can come from being quarantined may cause some people to want to reach for snacks as a way to self-soothe," he told Yale School of Medicine News.

And when we stress eat, we often choose nighttime snacks that are high in sugar and fat for a strategic biological reason: "They both create endorphins they literally make us feel better," Wright says.

One downside of those feel-good brain chemicals from midnight snacking on pints of Ben & Jerry's is they can be addictive, causing us to overconsume. Here's how late-night quarantine eating may affect your body.


What Happens to Your Body When You Late-Night Snack

Now that so many of us are spending most of our time at home, a lot of us are also staying up later and (most likely) eating more as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And hey, the late-night snack just comes calling sometimes. In fact, 42 percent of people say they are eating more snack foods since the virus started to spread in the United States and 23 percent admit to drinking more alcohol, according to a Harris Poll.

That doesn't come as much of a surprise to experts in stress and emotional eating. According to clinical psychologist Vaile Wright, Ph.D., senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association, it's common to reach for food in times of stress because it gives us a sense of control.

"The primary driver [of stress right now] is the uncertainty with this virus: It's invisible it happened very rapidly we still have questions about its transmissibility, and we have no cure," Wright says.

Stress and boredom can be huge overeating triggers, says Dwain Fehon, PsyD, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University and director of behavioral medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. "It's when we're not doing much, when we're idle or feeling overwhelmed, that we may eat as a way of managing stress. The boredom and restless energy that can come from being quarantined may cause some people to want to reach for snacks as a way to self-soothe," he told Yale School of Medicine News.

And when we stress eat, we often choose nighttime snacks that are high in sugar and fat for a strategic biological reason: "They both create endorphins they literally make us feel better," Wright says.

One downside of those feel-good brain chemicals from midnight snacking on pints of Ben & Jerry's is they can be addictive, causing us to overconsume. Here's how late-night quarantine eating may affect your body.


What Happens to Your Body When You Late-Night Snack

Now that so many of us are spending most of our time at home, a lot of us are also staying up later and (most likely) eating more as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And hey, the late-night snack just comes calling sometimes. In fact, 42 percent of people say they are eating more snack foods since the virus started to spread in the United States and 23 percent admit to drinking more alcohol, according to a Harris Poll.

That doesn't come as much of a surprise to experts in stress and emotional eating. According to clinical psychologist Vaile Wright, Ph.D., senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association, it's common to reach for food in times of stress because it gives us a sense of control.

"The primary driver [of stress right now] is the uncertainty with this virus: It's invisible it happened very rapidly we still have questions about its transmissibility, and we have no cure," Wright says.

Stress and boredom can be huge overeating triggers, says Dwain Fehon, PsyD, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University and director of behavioral medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. "It's when we're not doing much, when we're idle or feeling overwhelmed, that we may eat as a way of managing stress. The boredom and restless energy that can come from being quarantined may cause some people to want to reach for snacks as a way to self-soothe," he told Yale School of Medicine News.

And when we stress eat, we often choose nighttime snacks that are high in sugar and fat for a strategic biological reason: "They both create endorphins they literally make us feel better," Wright says.

One downside of those feel-good brain chemicals from midnight snacking on pints of Ben & Jerry's is they can be addictive, causing us to overconsume. Here's how late-night quarantine eating may affect your body.


What Happens to Your Body When You Late-Night Snack

Now that so many of us are spending most of our time at home, a lot of us are also staying up later and (most likely) eating more as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And hey, the late-night snack just comes calling sometimes. In fact, 42 percent of people say they are eating more snack foods since the virus started to spread in the United States and 23 percent admit to drinking more alcohol, according to a Harris Poll.

That doesn't come as much of a surprise to experts in stress and emotional eating. According to clinical psychologist Vaile Wright, Ph.D., senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association, it's common to reach for food in times of stress because it gives us a sense of control.

"The primary driver [of stress right now] is the uncertainty with this virus: It's invisible it happened very rapidly we still have questions about its transmissibility, and we have no cure," Wright says.

Stress and boredom can be huge overeating triggers, says Dwain Fehon, PsyD, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University and director of behavioral medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. "It's when we're not doing much, when we're idle or feeling overwhelmed, that we may eat as a way of managing stress. The boredom and restless energy that can come from being quarantined may cause some people to want to reach for snacks as a way to self-soothe," he told Yale School of Medicine News.

And when we stress eat, we often choose nighttime snacks that are high in sugar and fat for a strategic biological reason: "They both create endorphins they literally make us feel better," Wright says.

One downside of those feel-good brain chemicals from midnight snacking on pints of Ben & Jerry's is they can be addictive, causing us to overconsume. Here's how late-night quarantine eating may affect your body.


What Happens to Your Body When You Late-Night Snack

Now that so many of us are spending most of our time at home, a lot of us are also staying up later and (most likely) eating more as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And hey, the late-night snack just comes calling sometimes. In fact, 42 percent of people say they are eating more snack foods since the virus started to spread in the United States and 23 percent admit to drinking more alcohol, according to a Harris Poll.

That doesn't come as much of a surprise to experts in stress and emotional eating. According to clinical psychologist Vaile Wright, Ph.D., senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association, it's common to reach for food in times of stress because it gives us a sense of control.

"The primary driver [of stress right now] is the uncertainty with this virus: It's invisible it happened very rapidly we still have questions about its transmissibility, and we have no cure," Wright says.

Stress and boredom can be huge overeating triggers, says Dwain Fehon, PsyD, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University and director of behavioral medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. "It's when we're not doing much, when we're idle or feeling overwhelmed, that we may eat as a way of managing stress. The boredom and restless energy that can come from being quarantined may cause some people to want to reach for snacks as a way to self-soothe," he told Yale School of Medicine News.

And when we stress eat, we often choose nighttime snacks that are high in sugar and fat for a strategic biological reason: "They both create endorphins they literally make us feel better," Wright says.

One downside of those feel-good brain chemicals from midnight snacking on pints of Ben & Jerry's is they can be addictive, causing us to overconsume. Here's how late-night quarantine eating may affect your body.


What Happens to Your Body When You Late-Night Snack

Now that so many of us are spending most of our time at home, a lot of us are also staying up later and (most likely) eating more as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And hey, the late-night snack just comes calling sometimes. In fact, 42 percent of people say they are eating more snack foods since the virus started to spread in the United States and 23 percent admit to drinking more alcohol, according to a Harris Poll.

That doesn't come as much of a surprise to experts in stress and emotional eating. According to clinical psychologist Vaile Wright, Ph.D., senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association, it's common to reach for food in times of stress because it gives us a sense of control.

"The primary driver [of stress right now] is the uncertainty with this virus: It's invisible it happened very rapidly we still have questions about its transmissibility, and we have no cure," Wright says.

Stress and boredom can be huge overeating triggers, says Dwain Fehon, PsyD, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University and director of behavioral medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. "It's when we're not doing much, when we're idle or feeling overwhelmed, that we may eat as a way of managing stress. The boredom and restless energy that can come from being quarantined may cause some people to want to reach for snacks as a way to self-soothe," he told Yale School of Medicine News.

And when we stress eat, we often choose nighttime snacks that are high in sugar and fat for a strategic biological reason: "They both create endorphins they literally make us feel better," Wright says.

One downside of those feel-good brain chemicals from midnight snacking on pints of Ben & Jerry's is they can be addictive, causing us to overconsume. Here's how late-night quarantine eating may affect your body.


What Happens to Your Body When You Late-Night Snack

Now that so many of us are spending most of our time at home, a lot of us are also staying up later and (most likely) eating more as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And hey, the late-night snack just comes calling sometimes. In fact, 42 percent of people say they are eating more snack foods since the virus started to spread in the United States and 23 percent admit to drinking more alcohol, according to a Harris Poll.

That doesn't come as much of a surprise to experts in stress and emotional eating. According to clinical psychologist Vaile Wright, Ph.D., senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association, it's common to reach for food in times of stress because it gives us a sense of control.

"The primary driver [of stress right now] is the uncertainty with this virus: It's invisible it happened very rapidly we still have questions about its transmissibility, and we have no cure," Wright says.

Stress and boredom can be huge overeating triggers, says Dwain Fehon, PsyD, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University and director of behavioral medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. "It's when we're not doing much, when we're idle or feeling overwhelmed, that we may eat as a way of managing stress. The boredom and restless energy that can come from being quarantined may cause some people to want to reach for snacks as a way to self-soothe," he told Yale School of Medicine News.

And when we stress eat, we often choose nighttime snacks that are high in sugar and fat for a strategic biological reason: "They both create endorphins they literally make us feel better," Wright says.

One downside of those feel-good brain chemicals from midnight snacking on pints of Ben & Jerry's is they can be addictive, causing us to overconsume. Here's how late-night quarantine eating may affect your body.


What Happens to Your Body When You Late-Night Snack

Now that so many of us are spending most of our time at home, a lot of us are also staying up later and (most likely) eating more as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And hey, the late-night snack just comes calling sometimes. In fact, 42 percent of people say they are eating more snack foods since the virus started to spread in the United States and 23 percent admit to drinking more alcohol, according to a Harris Poll.

That doesn't come as much of a surprise to experts in stress and emotional eating. According to clinical psychologist Vaile Wright, Ph.D., senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association, it's common to reach for food in times of stress because it gives us a sense of control.

"The primary driver [of stress right now] is the uncertainty with this virus: It's invisible it happened very rapidly we still have questions about its transmissibility, and we have no cure," Wright says.

Stress and boredom can be huge overeating triggers, says Dwain Fehon, PsyD, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University and director of behavioral medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. "It's when we're not doing much, when we're idle or feeling overwhelmed, that we may eat as a way of managing stress. The boredom and restless energy that can come from being quarantined may cause some people to want to reach for snacks as a way to self-soothe," he told Yale School of Medicine News.

And when we stress eat, we often choose nighttime snacks that are high in sugar and fat for a strategic biological reason: "They both create endorphins they literally make us feel better," Wright says.

One downside of those feel-good brain chemicals from midnight snacking on pints of Ben & Jerry's is they can be addictive, causing us to overconsume. Here's how late-night quarantine eating may affect your body.


What Happens to Your Body When You Late-Night Snack

Now that so many of us are spending most of our time at home, a lot of us are also staying up later and (most likely) eating more as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And hey, the late-night snack just comes calling sometimes. In fact, 42 percent of people say they are eating more snack foods since the virus started to spread in the United States and 23 percent admit to drinking more alcohol, according to a Harris Poll.

That doesn't come as much of a surprise to experts in stress and emotional eating. According to clinical psychologist Vaile Wright, Ph.D., senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association, it's common to reach for food in times of stress because it gives us a sense of control.

"The primary driver [of stress right now] is the uncertainty with this virus: It's invisible it happened very rapidly we still have questions about its transmissibility, and we have no cure," Wright says.

Stress and boredom can be huge overeating triggers, says Dwain Fehon, PsyD, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University and director of behavioral medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. "It's when we're not doing much, when we're idle or feeling overwhelmed, that we may eat as a way of managing stress. The boredom and restless energy that can come from being quarantined may cause some people to want to reach for snacks as a way to self-soothe," he told Yale School of Medicine News.

And when we stress eat, we often choose nighttime snacks that are high in sugar and fat for a strategic biological reason: "They both create endorphins they literally make us feel better," Wright says.

One downside of those feel-good brain chemicals from midnight snacking on pints of Ben & Jerry's is they can be addictive, causing us to overconsume. Here's how late-night quarantine eating may affect your body.