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Obama Offers Dinner to Donators

Obama Offers Dinner to Donators

By donating money to President Obama’s campaign, you will be entered to win a dinner with Obama himself

Wikimedia Commons/Marc Nozell

President Obama

What does President Obama eat on the campaign trail? You can find out for yourself.

The Obama-Biden campaign is offering a meal with the president as a prize for donating money to the campaign.

After donating any amount you choose, you will automatically be entered to win a dinner with Obama, and one guest of your choice.

The winner and his or her guest will be flown out to meet President Obama on the campaign trail.

“These dinners mean something more than just a meal among friends,” Obama said in a press statement this morning. ”They represent the kind of politics we believe in. It's a simple but powerful idea: Everyone should have a seat at the table, no matter where you come from or how much you can afford to give.”

The donation tiers are $15, $25, $50, $100, $250, $500, $1000, and "Other," giving the donator the option to give as little or as much as he or she wants.

The project is called “Dinner with Barack,” and he’s inviting you to “meet me for dinner.”

This isn't the first time Obama will be dining with his donators. Check out what other Obama dinner winners did on their "date."


8 Ways to Decolonize and Honor Native Peoples on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, like Columbus Day, serves as a reminder of the genocide and violence Native communities experienced and continue to experience. Learn about Thanksgiving and early colonial history from Native perspectives.


The United States has ratified more than 370 treaties with Native American Nations. Yet, many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped and continue to impact the country today. Learn more here.

In honor of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, signed on September 17, 1851 between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations, the campaign taps music fans and supporters of Indigenous rights and culture in an effort to raise awareness of the wisdom in upholding and honoring treaties made with Native Nations. Learn more here.

2. Decolonize Your Dinner.
Native chefs have created a culinary movement with the goal of getting Indigenous people to honor their ancestors through their dietary choices. Bring Native American dishes to the dinner table.


3. Listen to Indigenous Voices.
It was the Wampanoag People, the People of the First Light, that encountered the Pilgrims when they arrived in Turtle Island from Europe in 1620. Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a national holiday in the United States, mythologizing the violent events that followed European arrival into a story of friendship and mutual sharing. But the reality is that the Wampanoags’ generosity was met with genocide, and this truth has been systematically suppressed in the US education system, government, and popular culture. Listen to an interview with Cedric Cromwell, the Tribal Council Chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Nation.

4. #StandwithMashpee

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe are calling on members of Congress to help “protect the statute of reservation” after the Trump Administration overturned an Obama era decision that could see their land taken from them. This marks the first time that Native land has been taken out of trust since the “Termination Era” of the 1940-60s, a huge blow to Indigenous sovereignty. Stand with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe by calling your representatives to pass HR 5244, THE MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBE RESERVATION REAFFIRMATION ACT.


5. Celebrate Native People.


  • Come to our Cultural Survival Bazaars and support Native artists on
    December
    15-16 and 21-23. www.bazaar.cs.org FREE ADMISSION


December 21-23, 2018
Prudential Center
Enter at the corner of Huntington Ave. and Belvidere St.
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199


8 Ways to Decolonize and Honor Native Peoples on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, like Columbus Day, serves as a reminder of the genocide and violence Native communities experienced and continue to experience. Learn about Thanksgiving and early colonial history from Native perspectives.


The United States has ratified more than 370 treaties with Native American Nations. Yet, many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped and continue to impact the country today. Learn more here.

In honor of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, signed on September 17, 1851 between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations, the campaign taps music fans and supporters of Indigenous rights and culture in an effort to raise awareness of the wisdom in upholding and honoring treaties made with Native Nations. Learn more here.

2. Decolonize Your Dinner.
Native chefs have created a culinary movement with the goal of getting Indigenous people to honor their ancestors through their dietary choices. Bring Native American dishes to the dinner table.


3. Listen to Indigenous Voices.
It was the Wampanoag People, the People of the First Light, that encountered the Pilgrims when they arrived in Turtle Island from Europe in 1620. Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a national holiday in the United States, mythologizing the violent events that followed European arrival into a story of friendship and mutual sharing. But the reality is that the Wampanoags’ generosity was met with genocide, and this truth has been systematically suppressed in the US education system, government, and popular culture. Listen to an interview with Cedric Cromwell, the Tribal Council Chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Nation.

4. #StandwithMashpee

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe are calling on members of Congress to help “protect the statute of reservation” after the Trump Administration overturned an Obama era decision that could see their land taken from them. This marks the first time that Native land has been taken out of trust since the “Termination Era” of the 1940-60s, a huge blow to Indigenous sovereignty. Stand with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe by calling your representatives to pass HR 5244, THE MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBE RESERVATION REAFFIRMATION ACT.


5. Celebrate Native People.


  • Come to our Cultural Survival Bazaars and support Native artists on
    December
    15-16 and 21-23. www.bazaar.cs.org FREE ADMISSION


December 21-23, 2018
Prudential Center
Enter at the corner of Huntington Ave. and Belvidere St.
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199


8 Ways to Decolonize and Honor Native Peoples on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, like Columbus Day, serves as a reminder of the genocide and violence Native communities experienced and continue to experience. Learn about Thanksgiving and early colonial history from Native perspectives.


The United States has ratified more than 370 treaties with Native American Nations. Yet, many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped and continue to impact the country today. Learn more here.

In honor of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, signed on September 17, 1851 between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations, the campaign taps music fans and supporters of Indigenous rights and culture in an effort to raise awareness of the wisdom in upholding and honoring treaties made with Native Nations. Learn more here.

2. Decolonize Your Dinner.
Native chefs have created a culinary movement with the goal of getting Indigenous people to honor their ancestors through their dietary choices. Bring Native American dishes to the dinner table.


3. Listen to Indigenous Voices.
It was the Wampanoag People, the People of the First Light, that encountered the Pilgrims when they arrived in Turtle Island from Europe in 1620. Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a national holiday in the United States, mythologizing the violent events that followed European arrival into a story of friendship and mutual sharing. But the reality is that the Wampanoags’ generosity was met with genocide, and this truth has been systematically suppressed in the US education system, government, and popular culture. Listen to an interview with Cedric Cromwell, the Tribal Council Chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Nation.

4. #StandwithMashpee

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe are calling on members of Congress to help “protect the statute of reservation” after the Trump Administration overturned an Obama era decision that could see their land taken from them. This marks the first time that Native land has been taken out of trust since the “Termination Era” of the 1940-60s, a huge blow to Indigenous sovereignty. Stand with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe by calling your representatives to pass HR 5244, THE MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBE RESERVATION REAFFIRMATION ACT.


5. Celebrate Native People.


  • Come to our Cultural Survival Bazaars and support Native artists on
    December
    15-16 and 21-23. www.bazaar.cs.org FREE ADMISSION


December 21-23, 2018
Prudential Center
Enter at the corner of Huntington Ave. and Belvidere St.
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199


8 Ways to Decolonize and Honor Native Peoples on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, like Columbus Day, serves as a reminder of the genocide and violence Native communities experienced and continue to experience. Learn about Thanksgiving and early colonial history from Native perspectives.


The United States has ratified more than 370 treaties with Native American Nations. Yet, many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped and continue to impact the country today. Learn more here.

In honor of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, signed on September 17, 1851 between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations, the campaign taps music fans and supporters of Indigenous rights and culture in an effort to raise awareness of the wisdom in upholding and honoring treaties made with Native Nations. Learn more here.

2. Decolonize Your Dinner.
Native chefs have created a culinary movement with the goal of getting Indigenous people to honor their ancestors through their dietary choices. Bring Native American dishes to the dinner table.


3. Listen to Indigenous Voices.
It was the Wampanoag People, the People of the First Light, that encountered the Pilgrims when they arrived in Turtle Island from Europe in 1620. Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a national holiday in the United States, mythologizing the violent events that followed European arrival into a story of friendship and mutual sharing. But the reality is that the Wampanoags’ generosity was met with genocide, and this truth has been systematically suppressed in the US education system, government, and popular culture. Listen to an interview with Cedric Cromwell, the Tribal Council Chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Nation.

4. #StandwithMashpee

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe are calling on members of Congress to help “protect the statute of reservation” after the Trump Administration overturned an Obama era decision that could see their land taken from them. This marks the first time that Native land has been taken out of trust since the “Termination Era” of the 1940-60s, a huge blow to Indigenous sovereignty. Stand with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe by calling your representatives to pass HR 5244, THE MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBE RESERVATION REAFFIRMATION ACT.


5. Celebrate Native People.


  • Come to our Cultural Survival Bazaars and support Native artists on
    December
    15-16 and 21-23. www.bazaar.cs.org FREE ADMISSION


December 21-23, 2018
Prudential Center
Enter at the corner of Huntington Ave. and Belvidere St.
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199


8 Ways to Decolonize and Honor Native Peoples on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, like Columbus Day, serves as a reminder of the genocide and violence Native communities experienced and continue to experience. Learn about Thanksgiving and early colonial history from Native perspectives.


The United States has ratified more than 370 treaties with Native American Nations. Yet, many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped and continue to impact the country today. Learn more here.

In honor of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, signed on September 17, 1851 between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations, the campaign taps music fans and supporters of Indigenous rights and culture in an effort to raise awareness of the wisdom in upholding and honoring treaties made with Native Nations. Learn more here.

2. Decolonize Your Dinner.
Native chefs have created a culinary movement with the goal of getting Indigenous people to honor their ancestors through their dietary choices. Bring Native American dishes to the dinner table.


3. Listen to Indigenous Voices.
It was the Wampanoag People, the People of the First Light, that encountered the Pilgrims when they arrived in Turtle Island from Europe in 1620. Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a national holiday in the United States, mythologizing the violent events that followed European arrival into a story of friendship and mutual sharing. But the reality is that the Wampanoags’ generosity was met with genocide, and this truth has been systematically suppressed in the US education system, government, and popular culture. Listen to an interview with Cedric Cromwell, the Tribal Council Chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Nation.

4. #StandwithMashpee

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe are calling on members of Congress to help “protect the statute of reservation” after the Trump Administration overturned an Obama era decision that could see their land taken from them. This marks the first time that Native land has been taken out of trust since the “Termination Era” of the 1940-60s, a huge blow to Indigenous sovereignty. Stand with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe by calling your representatives to pass HR 5244, THE MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBE RESERVATION REAFFIRMATION ACT.


5. Celebrate Native People.


  • Come to our Cultural Survival Bazaars and support Native artists on
    December
    15-16 and 21-23. www.bazaar.cs.org FREE ADMISSION


December 21-23, 2018
Prudential Center
Enter at the corner of Huntington Ave. and Belvidere St.
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199


8 Ways to Decolonize and Honor Native Peoples on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, like Columbus Day, serves as a reminder of the genocide and violence Native communities experienced and continue to experience. Learn about Thanksgiving and early colonial history from Native perspectives.


The United States has ratified more than 370 treaties with Native American Nations. Yet, many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped and continue to impact the country today. Learn more here.

In honor of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, signed on September 17, 1851 between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations, the campaign taps music fans and supporters of Indigenous rights and culture in an effort to raise awareness of the wisdom in upholding and honoring treaties made with Native Nations. Learn more here.

2. Decolonize Your Dinner.
Native chefs have created a culinary movement with the goal of getting Indigenous people to honor their ancestors through their dietary choices. Bring Native American dishes to the dinner table.


3. Listen to Indigenous Voices.
It was the Wampanoag People, the People of the First Light, that encountered the Pilgrims when they arrived in Turtle Island from Europe in 1620. Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a national holiday in the United States, mythologizing the violent events that followed European arrival into a story of friendship and mutual sharing. But the reality is that the Wampanoags’ generosity was met with genocide, and this truth has been systematically suppressed in the US education system, government, and popular culture. Listen to an interview with Cedric Cromwell, the Tribal Council Chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Nation.

4. #StandwithMashpee

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe are calling on members of Congress to help “protect the statute of reservation” after the Trump Administration overturned an Obama era decision that could see their land taken from them. This marks the first time that Native land has been taken out of trust since the “Termination Era” of the 1940-60s, a huge blow to Indigenous sovereignty. Stand with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe by calling your representatives to pass HR 5244, THE MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBE RESERVATION REAFFIRMATION ACT.


5. Celebrate Native People.


  • Come to our Cultural Survival Bazaars and support Native artists on
    December
    15-16 and 21-23. www.bazaar.cs.org FREE ADMISSION


December 21-23, 2018
Prudential Center
Enter at the corner of Huntington Ave. and Belvidere St.
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199


8 Ways to Decolonize and Honor Native Peoples on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, like Columbus Day, serves as a reminder of the genocide and violence Native communities experienced and continue to experience. Learn about Thanksgiving and early colonial history from Native perspectives.


The United States has ratified more than 370 treaties with Native American Nations. Yet, many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped and continue to impact the country today. Learn more here.

In honor of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, signed on September 17, 1851 between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations, the campaign taps music fans and supporters of Indigenous rights and culture in an effort to raise awareness of the wisdom in upholding and honoring treaties made with Native Nations. Learn more here.

2. Decolonize Your Dinner.
Native chefs have created a culinary movement with the goal of getting Indigenous people to honor their ancestors through their dietary choices. Bring Native American dishes to the dinner table.


3. Listen to Indigenous Voices.
It was the Wampanoag People, the People of the First Light, that encountered the Pilgrims when they arrived in Turtle Island from Europe in 1620. Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a national holiday in the United States, mythologizing the violent events that followed European arrival into a story of friendship and mutual sharing. But the reality is that the Wampanoags’ generosity was met with genocide, and this truth has been systematically suppressed in the US education system, government, and popular culture. Listen to an interview with Cedric Cromwell, the Tribal Council Chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Nation.

4. #StandwithMashpee

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe are calling on members of Congress to help “protect the statute of reservation” after the Trump Administration overturned an Obama era decision that could see their land taken from them. This marks the first time that Native land has been taken out of trust since the “Termination Era” of the 1940-60s, a huge blow to Indigenous sovereignty. Stand with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe by calling your representatives to pass HR 5244, THE MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBE RESERVATION REAFFIRMATION ACT.


5. Celebrate Native People.


  • Come to our Cultural Survival Bazaars and support Native artists on
    December
    15-16 and 21-23. www.bazaar.cs.org FREE ADMISSION


December 21-23, 2018
Prudential Center
Enter at the corner of Huntington Ave. and Belvidere St.
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199


8 Ways to Decolonize and Honor Native Peoples on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, like Columbus Day, serves as a reminder of the genocide and violence Native communities experienced and continue to experience. Learn about Thanksgiving and early colonial history from Native perspectives.


The United States has ratified more than 370 treaties with Native American Nations. Yet, many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped and continue to impact the country today. Learn more here.

In honor of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, signed on September 17, 1851 between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations, the campaign taps music fans and supporters of Indigenous rights and culture in an effort to raise awareness of the wisdom in upholding and honoring treaties made with Native Nations. Learn more here.

2. Decolonize Your Dinner.
Native chefs have created a culinary movement with the goal of getting Indigenous people to honor their ancestors through their dietary choices. Bring Native American dishes to the dinner table.


3. Listen to Indigenous Voices.
It was the Wampanoag People, the People of the First Light, that encountered the Pilgrims when they arrived in Turtle Island from Europe in 1620. Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a national holiday in the United States, mythologizing the violent events that followed European arrival into a story of friendship and mutual sharing. But the reality is that the Wampanoags’ generosity was met with genocide, and this truth has been systematically suppressed in the US education system, government, and popular culture. Listen to an interview with Cedric Cromwell, the Tribal Council Chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Nation.

4. #StandwithMashpee

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe are calling on members of Congress to help “protect the statute of reservation” after the Trump Administration overturned an Obama era decision that could see their land taken from them. This marks the first time that Native land has been taken out of trust since the “Termination Era” of the 1940-60s, a huge blow to Indigenous sovereignty. Stand with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe by calling your representatives to pass HR 5244, THE MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBE RESERVATION REAFFIRMATION ACT.


5. Celebrate Native People.


  • Come to our Cultural Survival Bazaars and support Native artists on
    December
    15-16 and 21-23. www.bazaar.cs.org FREE ADMISSION


December 21-23, 2018
Prudential Center
Enter at the corner of Huntington Ave. and Belvidere St.
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199


8 Ways to Decolonize and Honor Native Peoples on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, like Columbus Day, serves as a reminder of the genocide and violence Native communities experienced and continue to experience. Learn about Thanksgiving and early colonial history from Native perspectives.


The United States has ratified more than 370 treaties with Native American Nations. Yet, many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped and continue to impact the country today. Learn more here.

In honor of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, signed on September 17, 1851 between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations, the campaign taps music fans and supporters of Indigenous rights and culture in an effort to raise awareness of the wisdom in upholding and honoring treaties made with Native Nations. Learn more here.

2. Decolonize Your Dinner.
Native chefs have created a culinary movement with the goal of getting Indigenous people to honor their ancestors through their dietary choices. Bring Native American dishes to the dinner table.


3. Listen to Indigenous Voices.
It was the Wampanoag People, the People of the First Light, that encountered the Pilgrims when they arrived in Turtle Island from Europe in 1620. Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a national holiday in the United States, mythologizing the violent events that followed European arrival into a story of friendship and mutual sharing. But the reality is that the Wampanoags’ generosity was met with genocide, and this truth has been systematically suppressed in the US education system, government, and popular culture. Listen to an interview with Cedric Cromwell, the Tribal Council Chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Nation.

4. #StandwithMashpee

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe are calling on members of Congress to help “protect the statute of reservation” after the Trump Administration overturned an Obama era decision that could see their land taken from them. This marks the first time that Native land has been taken out of trust since the “Termination Era” of the 1940-60s, a huge blow to Indigenous sovereignty. Stand with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe by calling your representatives to pass HR 5244, THE MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBE RESERVATION REAFFIRMATION ACT.


5. Celebrate Native People.


  • Come to our Cultural Survival Bazaars and support Native artists on
    December
    15-16 and 21-23. www.bazaar.cs.org FREE ADMISSION


December 21-23, 2018
Prudential Center
Enter at the corner of Huntington Ave. and Belvidere St.
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199


8 Ways to Decolonize and Honor Native Peoples on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, like Columbus Day, serves as a reminder of the genocide and violence Native communities experienced and continue to experience. Learn about Thanksgiving and early colonial history from Native perspectives.


The United States has ratified more than 370 treaties with Native American Nations. Yet, many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped and continue to impact the country today. Learn more here.

In honor of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851, signed on September 17, 1851 between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations, the campaign taps music fans and supporters of Indigenous rights and culture in an effort to raise awareness of the wisdom in upholding and honoring treaties made with Native Nations. Learn more here.

2. Decolonize Your Dinner.
Native chefs have created a culinary movement with the goal of getting Indigenous people to honor their ancestors through their dietary choices. Bring Native American dishes to the dinner table.


3. Listen to Indigenous Voices.
It was the Wampanoag People, the People of the First Light, that encountered the Pilgrims when they arrived in Turtle Island from Europe in 1620. Since 1863, Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a national holiday in the United States, mythologizing the violent events that followed European arrival into a story of friendship and mutual sharing. But the reality is that the Wampanoags’ generosity was met with genocide, and this truth has been systematically suppressed in the US education system, government, and popular culture. Listen to an interview with Cedric Cromwell, the Tribal Council Chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Nation.

4. #StandwithMashpee

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe are calling on members of Congress to help “protect the statute of reservation” after the Trump Administration overturned an Obama era decision that could see their land taken from them. This marks the first time that Native land has been taken out of trust since the “Termination Era” of the 1940-60s, a huge blow to Indigenous sovereignty. Stand with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe by calling your representatives to pass HR 5244, THE MASHPEE WAMPANOAG TRIBE RESERVATION REAFFIRMATION ACT.


5. Celebrate Native People.


  • Come to our Cultural Survival Bazaars and support Native artists on
    December
    15-16 and 21-23. www.bazaar.cs.org FREE ADMISSION


December 21-23, 2018
Prudential Center
Enter at the corner of Huntington Ave. and Belvidere St.
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199